What You Need To Know For Wednesday, Dec. 9 2015

name of site - hunter thompson style

Tombstone – 1993

1.

Tombstone, Arizona

When you have a huge spider bite on your arm that bleeds constantly, you begin to look at your own appendage in a morbid trance of disfigurement.  You cannot wear short sleeves, or at least shouldn’t, as to not arouse the locals.  The inner-voice never seems to quiet itself and causes a kind of internal chaos that makes you think of screeching animals descending all around you and your world is falling apart – like an earthquake in slow-motion – howls and curses, blowing horns and police sirens as a backdrop to something slowly dying.

Or at least that would be my impression of such a thing.  Much like the bombshell trade in name only with the Diamondbacks and Braves yesterday.  I say “in name only” because the mind jumps that Shelby Miller is a great pitcher and the D-backs have an impressive 1-2 punch with the earlier signing of Greinke.

Miller is being sold as an ace – he’s not – he’s a #3 on a team that has championship aspirations.  For Arizona, just because you HAVE aspirations, doesn’t mean you are championship material.  Here’s the problem with the trade Arizona fan should consider:  You traded away Inciarte and Dansby Swanson, the kind of prospect that could be dealt for an actual ace, who will not spend a lot of time in the minors, as an already polished college player from Vanderbilt.

My point is, if this is what they were willing to deal away because of the urgency felt to contend; then why not try for Jose Fernandez who is better and cheaper, or Sonny Gray.  it is reasonable to assume that the pitcher Arizona traded away, (Aaron Blair) could be the same pitcher they just traded with Atlanta for, except he’s cheaper and they would have him longer than the 3yrs they have Miller for.  Yes, prospects do not always pan out, and if the D-bags make the playoffs, or a World Series within the next three years, then maybe this deal ends up a push, is that enough to still be worth it, the future for 3 years?  What has the front-office done to earn that right to believe they have done nothing but get fleeced amongst the sound of something being killed.  Just ask San Diego.

2.

Matt Ryan Leaf

What happenned to this guy?  That’s the question several Falcons fans have been wondering for the last 6 weeks.  ESPN’s Vaughn McClure reported that Matt has been overwhelmed by Kyle Shanahan’s playbook.  There are times that it looks like Ryan Leaf is playing QB for the Falcons – it’s not that far of a stretch, they do look a lot like – Has Matt lost confidence?  Is his recent struggles a trend?  Does Atlanta look for a replacement?

I say we slow the roll and because I think it lies mostly with Kyle Shanahan.  For starters, give me the last QB that was successful under Kyle Shanahan – none and why is that, because he is a QB killer.  His play-calling is the worst – Devonta only has 14 carries for 50yds against Tampa, he fails to consistently get the ball to Julio Jones to let him dominate a game – like the Steelers let Antonio Brown do.  Julio is the only receiver on the team and you waste plays throwing to Roddy White who would still be a third option in Carolina.  Was it Matt Ryan that was supposed to stop Jameis Winston from his 3rd and 19 run for a first down?  Matt has made some mistakes for sure, but it is more than just him – average line, average talent, below-average play-caller with arrogant-entitlement issues.

So the writing is on the wall for Dan Quinn – do you want to be Mike Smith 2.0 or do you really want to bring a championship to the ol’Dirty.  Before Matt Ryan, Atlanta never had back-to-back winning seasons – with Matt Ryan, 5 straight.  For all Saints fans, the best thing for you to do Dan, is keep Kyle and get rid of Matty Ice.

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3.

Lords of Chaos

Some men just want to watch the world burn.

— Alfred Pennyworth (The Dark Knight)

Indeed and now we have a real and fantastic possibility to root for.  Cheering for the two best teams equates to fascism, hoping for a Jaguars/Eagles football championship is more democratic.  So join me on DJ Gallo’s wild ride of stink-i-tude as he dissects the beauty of such a possibility we all want, deep-deep down in the cockles of our hearts.

4.

West Coast Bias

The NCAA is a Rogue-Nation with its own agenda and has operated without accountability for decades.  Take the matter of USC and a recent court ruling calling into question how the NCAA Cartel enforces the institutions it is mutually charged with overseeing.  The court ruling is just another abusive-self-induced black eye that sheds light on the questionable gestappo tactics and decisions the NCAA has used in other cases like Penn St or Miami.

Someday in our lifetime, the NCAA will be gone and something that will truly represent what college athletics could be.  But not until the pimps, (coaches) are punished for their actual crimes as CEO over a free-labor force that generates them millions of dollars without consequences.  It’s just my opinion, I could be wrong.

5.

Spurs of the Moment

The Spurs love the Warriors.  All the attention is on Golden State, as it should be, but while the spotlight blinds, the Spurs are currently 18-4.  As Hunter Felt explains, the Spurs wouldn’t want this flight under the radar any other way – here’s to a healthy Warriors/Spurs Western Conference Finals!

LeBron James has endorsed Nike since signing with the brand in 2003.
6.

“You’re Welcome” – Michael Jordan

LeBron James will be in the Nike stable for the rest of his basketball career — and beyond.

The world’s largest sporting goods company Monday signed the four-time NBA MVP to an unprecedented lifetime contract. Terms of the deal weren’t released, but sports agent David Falk, who represented Michael Jordan for most of his playing career, estimated its value at $400 million to $500 million.……(continue reading)

Source: LeBron James Signs Unprecedented Lifetime Deal With Nike

Clear as Mud

Yesterday, Adrian Peterson had a question for us on Twitter – he asked if “a contract is two-sided or one?”.  Before I could answer him, he went on an epic rant – clearly he had too many Pina Coladas and I thought it might be better for him to sleep it off and wait until the morning.

Someone answer him so he can continue.

Yo, Adrian! Remember that time last year when you still got paid $11.75m for beating your kid and played one game?!  Do you remember that your contract says you get $12.75m this year, $5m more than any other RB in the NFL?!  It seems more like you are arguing that YOU should not have to honor your contract?  While I agree with him in principle, He’s still an asshole – but if you want something different, then help change the collective bargaining agreement your Union agreed to!  Currently, a NFL team gives a player a contract and then can decide later, for a variety of reasons, if they want to cut him – it’s the ol’Switch-A-Roo (see what I did there? Sick burn, I know) – My point is this: NFL contracts are contracts, but they’re not guaranteed, (they do have guaranteed money) and there are certain things the team can and cannot do with them, and you would know this if you read the contract. And the fact the team can whack you after one year of your supposed five-year deal, or franchise you, or cut you at a date that is most advantageous for them, but not for you has been agreed to in collective bargaining. NFL players were hell-bent on getting free agency back in the 90’s, and they got it, while giving up a whole bunch of other stuff – and they lost the last go-round of near-work stoppage because management always wins in football and always loses in baseball. Because there’s always another football player out there who will play, while nobody but Pedro Borbon would cross a baseball picket line.

Sure, it’s draconian. But the facts that baseball teams stay on the hook for guys who have long since declined below their level of compensation (yes, no one forces teams to sign players to stupid contracts) and the “expiring contract” is often as big an asset in the NBA as an actual player who can play, are also messed up.

So, let him retire, let him force his way out, there will still be some-team who wants a child-abusing running back on the north-side of his career with over 10,000 yards on the odometer, (we’re looking at you Jerr-uh).  But instead of trumpeting your own horn about contract inequities, Adrian – why are you not addressing the obvious blackball of Ray Rice?!  While I don’t think Ray Rice has the physical ability to be an NFL back at this point (he didn’t look very good two years ago), why is it Rice hasn’t gotten a tryout with anyone, when Ray McDonald was able to land a deal with the Bears – and we all know how that turned out.  Adrian pleaded out, Rice has been acquitted, and one is trying to get work and the other won’t because of his ego – if only he thought about any of his sons as much as he thinks of himself.


 

MLB

nullNice debut for Rodriguez

Eduardo Rodriguez may be here to stay – the 22-year-old lefty tallied seven strikeouts over 7.2 scoreless innings in his major-league debut, leading the Red Sox to a 5-1 victory over the Rangers. Rodriguez is the first Red Sox pitcher in 48 years to throw at least seven shutout innings while recording a win in his MLB debut. On April 14, 1967, Billy Rohr threw a complete-game one-hit shutout against the Yankees in his first major-league appearance. In fact, Rohr had a no-hitter intact with two outs in the ninth inning before Elston Howard’s single ended the rookie’s chance at history. Despite the auspicious start, Rohr recorded just two more wins in his major-league career.

Prior to Rodriguez on Thursday, 95 pitchers had made their major-league debut at Globe Life Park in Arlington since the stadium opened in 1994. Rodriguez is the second pitcher of that group to throw at least seven innings without surrendering a run. On August 16, 2000, Brian Sikorskistarted for Texas and blanked the Yankees for seven innings in his major-league debut. That would be the only ‘W’ that Sikorski would record as a starting pitcher – he earned three more wins pitching in relief in 2006, his final season in the majors.

Giants post another squa-doosh at home

Including Thursday’s 7-0 whitewashing of the Braves, the Giants have recorded eight shutouts in May, all of which have come at AT&T Park. San Francisco is the only NL team in the last 99 seasons (1917-2015) to tally at least eight shutouts at home in a calendar month. The Giants themselves were the last NL team to achieve that feat – in September 1916, the New York Giants won an incredible 27 games at the Polo Grounds, including 10 shutout victories. Both the 27 wins at home and 10 shutout victories at home are major-league records for any team in a month.

nullBeckwith’s favorite pitcher still buzzing for Miller despite loss

Shelby Miller, who took the hard-luck loss in San Francisco after allowing one run in seven innings, owns an earned run average of 1.48 after his first 10 starts with the Braves. That’s the second-lowest ERA through ten starts for any pitcher who joined the Braves since 1966, when the franchise relocated to Atlanta. Buzz Capra, who began the 1974 season in the bullpen for the Braves, moved into the starting rotation in mid-May and allowed just nine earned runs in 78? innings over his first 10 starts with the team, good for a 1.03 ERA.

null50 K’s in four starts? Really?!

Corey Kluber rang up another 13 strikeouts on Thursday against the Mariners, increasing his total to 50 K’s over his last four starts. Kluber is the first pitcher in Indians history to record at least 50 strikeouts over a span of four starts within a single season, though Bob Feller achieved that feat for Cleveland in a multi-season span of four starts (the Hall-of-Famer struck out 18 in his final start of 1938 and 32 over his first three starts of 1939). The last pitcher in the majors before Kluber with at least 50 K’s over a span of four starts was Randy Johnson, who punched out 54 batters over four games in August 2004.

nullOrioles on Sale

Chris Sale racked up 12 K’s over 7.2 scoreless innings, helping the White Sox win the opener of their doubleheader with the Orioles. The lanky lefty has reached double-digits in K’s in 21 of his 94 starts in the majors, making him the fourth left-handed pitcher that has debuted in the modern era (since 1900) and has struck out 10 or more batters at least 20 times within his first 100 career starts. The other three southpaws to accomplish that feat are Sam McDowell (28 times, 1961-66 Indians), Herb Score (26 times, 1955-59 Indians), and Johan Santana (21 times, 2000-05 Twins).

O’s take split

Adam Eaton hit a leadoff homer to start the second game of the doubleheader for the White Sox, but the Orioles responded with two runs of their own in the bottom of the first to take the lead, helping Baltimore earn a split against Chicago on Thursday. The Orioles are now 10-0 this season when they hold a lead at the end of the first inning. The only other team that is undefeated in that scenario this season is the Cardinals, who are 14-0 when outscoring their opponents in the opening frame.

nullSabathia blows lead

After starting his night with four shutout innings, CC Sabathia allowed five runs over the next three frames, squandering the Yankees’ 3-0 lead in the A’s 5-4 victory. Since joining the Yankees in 2009, CC Sabathia is now 70-2 in 81 starts in which he was staked to a lead of at least three runs. Sabathia’s only loss in that scenario prior to Thursday was on June 28, 2013 against the Orioles – he allowed four runs in that start after the Yankees took a 3-0 lead.

New-Angel in the outfield scores twice in blowout

Nine Angels players scored at least one run in their 12-2 romp over the Tigers. The flock of run-scoring Angels included Kirk Nieuwenhuis, who scored two runs in his debut for Los Angeles despite no official at-bats in the game. The former Mets outfielder scored a run in the sixth inning after pinch-running for Matt Joyce, then he scored another on Chris Iannetta‘s grand slam in the seventh after drawing a walk. Only two players before Nieuwenhuis scored multiple runs in their Angels debut without recording a hit – Joe Lahoud (April 1974) and Jack Howell (May 1985). Both players scored exactly two runs, and Lahoud, like Nieuwenhuis, had no official at-bats in his debut with the team.

nullMcCutchen keeps proving Beckwith wrong, Pirates keep winning

Andrew McCutchen went 3-for-5 at the plate with a pair of RBI doubles, helping the Pirates defeat the Padres, 11-5. McCutchen’s cold start to the season looks far behind him now – the former MVP had recorded a subpar .188 batting average after 26 games along with 13 RBIs and just five extra-base hits. In 20 games since then, McCutchen is batting .384 with 16 RBIs and 14 extra-base hits; his 28 hits over that span are tied for the most in the National League.

Balls in the DiRT

No. 715

Hank Aaron

April 8th, 1974

The Hammer! A few times and far less often than we hope, do our heroes maintain themselves thru the stains of time.  Too often, they seem to creatively find ways to shatter those illusions, like a soft-grip of a favorite snow-globe of our youth.  Those delusions are ours and not theirs.  Rare is a hero that sets off on a knight’s quest towards one of baseball’s Holy Grail’s, only to carry with him a quiet dignity of fotitude and stoicism that relies more on substance than of flash – and for that we must always give thanks to Henry “Hammerin’ Hank” Aaron.  Give him the unconditional love he deserves.  Remember 715.  Remember a man that did not masquerade or exploit his talents to gain his seat at the table, he earned his place in the Pantheon.  Celebrate The Hammer!

He is a Saint and an example of all that is good within us and what we can achieve by just putting our head down and getting to work – regardless of outside distractions.  It is a shame, that on that night, in the 4th innning, what he felt after hitting Al Downing’s pitch over the left field wall, was not joy at the accomplishment, but relief.  Babe Ruth was larger than life, with larger appetites, and while he was gregarious and still maintains a popular place in the church of baseball – The Hammer was a contrast of muted poise.  Babe Ruth would have embraced it all, the energy, the party; where as Hank – under constant harassment by the media and fans, appeared as concerned with it all as a man does with a child asking for a new balloon.  There were more flamboyant superstars during Aaron’s 21 year career that shined brighter and preferred to hover in the spotlight –  while Hank comfortably went to work in the shadows that they’d cast.  He was just a man, doing his job and wanting to live a normal life, like anyone else.

Here it is, in his own words, from Hank Aaron’s autobiography, “I Had a Hammer” about that night:

When I was alone and the door was shut, I got down on my knees and closed my eyes and thanked God for pulling me through.  At that moment, I knew what the past twenty-five years of my life had been about.  I had done something that nobody else in the world had done, and with it came a feeling that nobody else has ever had – not exactly, anyway.  I didn’t feel a wild sense of joy.  I didn’t feel like celebrating.  But I probably felt closer to God at that moment than at any other in my life.  I felt a deep sense of gratitude and a wonderful surge of liberation all at the same time.  I also felt a stream of tears running down my face.

Aaron retired after the 1976 season with the Brewers and ended with 755 Home-Runs.  He is a sports hero we deserve, and we should remind him how much we appreciate all that he exemplifies, what is good within us.  It isn’t about shouting, asking where your 15 seconds of fame and notoriety are, despite being attached to the digital freeway, looking for instant gratification, and validation.  It’s about grace, quiet dignity, hard work and perseverance – that in time, we too have a shot at being exceptional – it may not mean we will be an all-timer – but it does mean we can walk with our head held high, knowing we gave it all we had – just like the Hammer!



 

Go Home Hostess, you’re drunk!

Baseball is back and this seamhead is pumped – at least for a while.  Meaning the Rockies, of course they are 2-0 and in first place, all by themselves – regardless if we have seen how this story usually ends in June.  It’s just 83 more W’s for my prediction to come true, as I wrote here back in February.  Just remember, Crazy is a term of Art – Insanity is term of Law, and I am still not insane – I have a sticker to prove it.

But what we have decided to do, is provide some help with your Daily Fantasy Baseball needs:  It will not be as full-blown as our NBA coverage until next year, but it will help you get an idea of who to consider – so without further ado….

Consider that 4 players for the Colorado Rockies have a batting average of .500 or better against Milwaukee’s Wily Peralta and that Tulo, in 14 plate appearances against Peralta has 3 singles and 4 walks.  The other 4 are Nolan Arenado, Nick Hundley, Justin Morneau and Corey Dickerson.  The issue being for some is the possibility of rest.  No Rest for these guys? Then we could look at a road sweep to start the year before welcoming the National League Champion Cubs (sarcasm) for the Home Opener Friday.

Consider staying away from Pujols and Trout against Iwakura of the Mariners.  In 26 and 27 at-bats, both Trout and Pujols hit below .200.  However, if they can get to him, it is usually for xtra-base-hits.  In Trout’s 5 hits he has 4 singles and 1 HR and Pujols’ 5 hits are for 2 singles and 3 doubles.  What you have to consider, is the price worth the performance?

Consider neither pitcher for the Orioles or the Rays are gonna stop anyone from htting the ball around the yard and consider that Oakland could shell Texas Rangers’ pitcher Ross Detwiler.

Consider Daniel Murphy and his excellent matchup against Jordan Zimmerman.  Murphy is 16 for 50 against Zimmerman with 5 doubles, 3 HR’s and only 2 strikeouts.  Others that have good matchups are both Mike (Giancarlo) Stanton and Christian Yellich against Shelby Miller – both are a combined 6-11 with 2 HR’s, 2 singles and a double.

Consider these guys by position, for your lineup today that have the best matchup and best potential:

1B

Daniel Murphy

Steve Pearce

Jose Abreu

Justin Morneau (if he plays, took a throw to the neck last night)

2B

Robinson Cano

Ian Kinsler

Adam Rosales

3B

Josh Harrison

Chris Johnson

Mike Moustakas

Nolan Arenado (if he plays)

SS

Hanley Ramirez

Juan Uribe

Tulo (if he plays)

C

Salvador Perez

Welington Castillo

Nick Hundley (if he plays)

OF

Lorenzo Cain

Andrew McCutchen

Mike (Giancarlo) Stanton

Desmond Jennings (4HR’s against M.Gonzales but strikes out 19.4% against him)

Shin-soo-choo

Ben Revere

Corey Dickerson

P

Carlos Carrasco

Anibal Sanchez

Brandon McCarthy