Thy Cup Runneth Over

No I didn’t. Honest… I ran out of gas! I–I had a flat tire! I didn’t have enough money for cab fare! My tux didn’t come back from the cleaners! An old friend came in from out of town! Someone stole my car! There was an earthquake! A terrible flood! Locusts! IT WASN’T MY FAULT, I SWEAR TO GOD!!!  The scene from Blues Brothers was eerily similar to the actual events outside of the United Center last night.  Word of Tornadoes, flooding, severe weather, the roof leaking – all of it, delaying Lord Stanley’s Cup.

But it was delivered and it has been delivered to the city of Chicago, on home ice, for the first time since 1934, (1938, they never brought it).  This marks the 3rd time in 6 years the Blackhawks have won the Cup, and who knows if they could have had a three-peat if not for the Game 7 loss last year in the Western Conference Finals – either way the city of Chicago is excited as are Blackhawk fans who had to suffer for decades under Bill Wirtz to witness greatness.  Watch this fan describe how awesome the ‘Hawks are:

Notes I cannot put anywhere else:

  • Crawford’s shutout clinches Cup for Chicago

    With his 2-0 win over the Lightning, Corey Crawford became the fifth goaltender in the last 39 years to record a Stanley Cup-clinching shutout victory. The other goaltenders to do that since 1976 are Pittsburgh Tom Barrasso in 1991 (8-0 at Minnesota), Colorado’s Patrick Roy in 1996 (1-0 at Florida in triple-overtime), New Jersey’s Martin Brodeur in 2003 (3-0 vs. Anaheim) and Boston’s Tim Thomas in 2011 (4-0 at Vancouver).

    nullKeith’s game-winner cements Conn SmytheDuncan Keith scored only one goal in this year’s Stanley Cup Final but it was the game-winning goal in Chicago’s 2-0 series-clinching victory. Keith, who was named the Conn Smythe Trophy winner as the 2015 playoff MVP, is the eighth player in the NHL’s expansion era whose only goal in a Stanley Cup Final series was the game-winner in the deciding game. The other players to do that since 1968 were J.C. Tremblay (1968 Canadiens), Bobby Orr (1970 Bruins), Ken Linseman (1984 Oilers), Ron Francis (1992 Penguins), Darren McCarty (1997 Red Wings), Mike Rupp (2003 Devils) and Alec Martinez (2014 Kings).

    No player scores three goals in Final

    For the second consecutive year no player on either team scored more than two goals in the Stanley Cup Final. Chicago’s Brandon Saad, Teuvo Teravainen and Antoine Vermette, and Tampa Bay’s Alex Killorn and Cedric Paquette were the co-leaders with two goals each in this year’s Final, after three Kings and two Rangers shared goal-scoring honors with two goals apiece in the 2014 Final. Before last year, the only best-of-seven Stanley Cup Final in which no player managed to score at least three goals was the 1968 series in which the Montreal Canadiensswept the first-year expansion St. Louis Blues team in four games. The joint leaders with two goals each in that series were Yvon Cournoyer, Henri Richard and Serge Savard of the Canadiens, and Red Berenson of the Blues.

  • I’m also not buying that Bishop played with a torn-right-groin – Sorry, there is no physical way you could do that – a torn groin?!  Just say you had cramps like NBA guys do.

 

One Tree Hill – will also accept: The Joshua Tree

This golf course – Chambers Bay – looks like a course designed on the moon and planted in Scotland – it only has ONE TREE!  I am so enamored with this course, that I can not wait to waste hours watching guys spoiling a good walk.  I’m also gonna play my hand at winning a $1,000,000 with Draft Kings.   That should make it more entertaining to see if I can pick 6 golfers and watch Team Cartwright beat the field.  The golfers may not know it – but they play for me – muwahahahahaha!  You should play too & see if you can do better than us – it’s easy – just sign up here!  Here are some high-end guys you might wanna consider:

Justin Rose
Dustin Johnson
Phil Mickelson 
Henrik Stenson

 


Ty on third by Bill Purdom

Souza walks five times

Rookie Steven Souza walked five times in five plate appearances in the Rays’ 6-1 home win over the Nationals. The last major-league player to draw five bases on balls in a nine-inning game was another Tampa Bay outfielder, Matt Joyce, on April 25, 2014 against the White Sox. The last rookie to work five walks in a game was the Mets’ Mike Baxter, at San Diego on August 4, 2012.

nullCain homers in return to Milwaukee

Lorenzo Cain was 2-for-5 with a two-run home run in the Royals’ 8-5 win at Milwaukee. Cain, who broke into the majors with the Brewers in 2010 and was part of the package Milwaukee sent to Kansas City to acquire Zack Greinke the following winter, was making his first appearance against his former team. He’s the second ex-Brewer this season to homer in his first game after leaving the team, joiningNori Aoki, who connected at Miller Park on May 25. In the previous 15 seasons (2000-2014), only one ex-Milwaukee player did that against his former team: Jim Edmonds in 2010.

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Sanchez pitches another gem vs. NL

Anibal Sanchez threw a complete-game shutout in the Tigers’ 6-0 home win over the Reds. In his previous outing, Sanchez tossed 7.2 scoreless innings in a win over the Cubs. Since interleague play began in 1997, only two other pitchers have won two straight starts, both against the opposite league, while going more than seven innings and not allowing a run. Greg Maddux (1998) and Mark Mulder (2001) posted back-to-back shutouts in consecutive starts versus interleague opponents.

nullGoldy’s bat downs Halos

Paul Goldschmidt singled, doubled, and homered in the Diamondbacks’ 7-3 win over the Angels in Anaheim. It was Goldschmidt’s sixth game this season in which he recorded at least three hits and one home run. That’s the second-highest total in the majors behind Miguel Cabrera (7).

nullOdor raps three hits in return to majors

Rougned Odor, in his first game since returning from the minors, went 3-for-3 with two RBIs in the Rangers’ 4-1 home win over the Dodgers. In his first stint in Texas this season, Odor recorded just one multi-hit game (and no three-hit games) in 25 starts. The only player with at least 20 starts in 2015 who had more than one hit in a lower percentage of them than Odor (4%) was the Mariners’ Dustin Ackley (1 in 41, 2%).

null

Molina finally goes deep

Yadier Molina‘s first home run since June 27, 2014 gave the Cardinals a 3-0 lead and St. Louis held on to beat Minnesota, 3-2. Molina’s 342-at bat regular-season homer drought was the longest of his career, nearly 30% longer than his previous longest streak of 267 at bats in 2009.

nullLoMo plays an unconventional position for a leadoff batter

Logan Morrison, leading off and playing first base, was 3-for-5 with a stolen base in the Mariners’ 5-1 win at San Francisco. Only one other starting first baseman in the past 16 seasons has put up three hits and a steal from the top lineup slot: Brock Holt for the Red Sox on June 1, 2014.

nullDietrich scores twice in first start of season

Derek Dietrich, making his first start of the season, homered and scored both Marlins runs in Miami’s 2-1 home win over the Yankees. The last player to score all of his team’s runs in a one-run win while starting his first game of the season in June or later was the Angels’ Shawn Wooten, in a 1-0 win over the Royals on July 11, 2002.

Fore!

Chambers Bay, WA – June 18th, 2015

The Greatest Game Ever Played poster.JPGJune 18th begins America’s Championship in Golf, in Tacoma at Chambers Bay.  It also features Draft Kings and your chance at $1,000,000 with their FANTASY GOLF MILLIONAIRE MAKER.  But let’s remember the man who made Golf important in this country – Francis Ouimet.  In 1913, he was the original Cinderella story.  Robert Watson, (President of the USGA) asked if he would play in the national professional championship, which had been postponed to mid-September from its original June dates to allow for the participation of British golfers Harry Vardon and Ted Ray.  Vardon won America’s national professional championship in 1900 and our championship five times to that point; Ray also won the America’s national professional championship in 1912. The event was played at the course Ouimet knew best, The Country Club in Brookline, Massachusetts. Ouimet originally declined to play, having just returned from an absence from work to play in the National Amateur. His participation in the Open was soon arranged, however, with the cooperation of his employer.

It was Ouimet’s first appearance in the championship. After 72 holes of play finished in a three-way tie, Ouimet, Vardon, and Ray went on to an 18-hole playoff the next day in rainy conditions, won by Ouimet. His victory was widely hailed as a stunning upset over the strongly favored British, who were regarded as the top two golfers in the world. He was the first amateur to win America’s national professional championship, the biggest crowds ever seen in American golf followed the playoff, and his achievement was front-page news across the country.

Ouimet’s success is credited for bringing golf into the American sporting mainstream. Before his win over Vardon and Ray, golf was dominated by British players. In America, the sport was restricted to players with access to private facilities. There were very few public courses (the first, Van Cortlandt Golf Course in The Bronx borough of New York City, opened in 1895). Ten years after his 1913 victory, the number of American players had tripled and many new courses had been built, including numerous public ones.

It was not without controversy.  Ouimet never turned professional; he wished to remain an amateur for his whole career, as he decided before his success that he wanted to work in the world of business. In 1916, however, the USGA, in one of the most controversial decisions in their history, stripped Ouimet of his amateur status. Its reasoning was that he was using his celebrity to aid his own sporting goods business and was therefore making a living from golf. This was at the time when caddies were not allowed to continue caddying after they reached the age of 16, unless they declared themselves professionals. The decision was greeted with uproar from Ouimet’s fellow golfers. In 1918, Ouimet enlisted in the U.S. Army and rose to the rank of lieutenant. After the war, the USGA quietly reinstated his amateur status. Ouimet did not bear a grudge against the USGA and served on several committees. He was also a golf member of Charles River Country Club in Newton Centre, and was a member of the Woodland Golf Club of Auburndale.

Ouimet won his second U.S. Amateur in 1931. During the 1920s, he lost several close matches to Bobby Jones, who dominated amateur golf for that decade.

So pick 6 golfers and follow along as they play Chambers Bay.  You cannot win $1,000,000 if you don’t play – hurry and enter, because it fills up fast!  Sign up here, or click any one of the pictures to enter – here are some Low Ownership guys with potential, to consider – and remember to never take the guy who won a tournament before a Major:

  • Adam Scott
  • Henrik Stenson
  • Martin Kaymer
  • Jimmy Walker