Everyone Loves The Drake! – #CFP

name of site - hunter thompson style

1.

How Can You Not Love The Drake?!

Thank you ESPN.  Now, just like last year with Urban Meyer, we have to hear if coach X is the greatest ever.  Stop it.  Do we have to do this every year?  This guy in this category, or that category or Mt.Rushmore, blah-blah-blah – and it will be all day – ALL DAY, that Saban will be in more ESPN mouths than a whore on dollar day.

But that game tho.  It was an all-timer.  You can point to a few moments in the game that were true turning points; OJ Howard end-a-round, onside-kick, or The Drake’s Return, and it still almost wasn’t enough.  Alabama needed all of it.

While ESPN talks about Saban, let’s talk about this guy:

Kiffin has come a long way from the LAX tarmac and you could further say this was his redemption song. No matter your thoughts on the guy personally, he was in-charge all game with his formatons and play calling.  Seriously, OJ Howard had gone about 2 years without a touchdown and Kiffin dialed up plays that left him wide open for huge gains.  When Saban called for the onside kick, Kiffin said; “I had to look away because I was afraid I was going to make a face.”  Maybe some still view him as not ready, but he is maturing and becoming the coach that maybe Al Davis saw all along.

The MVP?  That’s Alabama tight end O.J. Howard – 5 catches for 208 yards and a pair of touchdowns. You or I could have caught those TD passes of 53 and 51 yards and ran in untouched, as long as we left the piano on the sideline, but we would not have looked as good doing it.  It’s been awhile since someone with the name OJ had a game like that.

But the play of the game is The Drake.  Remember the Tigers had just kicked a field goal to close to within 31-27 midway through the fourth quarter when they kicked off to Kenyon Drake. He sprinted up the right hash, avoided one tackler, then trucked to the left sideline. It didn’t look like he had the angle, but The Drake turned on the jets, got to the sideline, and headed upfield. 95-yard TD. 38-27. It was then that it felt that…the Tide had turned – pun intended.  Sure the onside-kick was a few minutes earlier, and important just to give the D a rest and change the momentum Clemson was gaining – also a huge play. But this one puts Clemson down double digits, and everyone thought that was the nail.  Without The Drake, we might be having a different conversation today.

2.

Ziggy Played Guitar

‘HEROES,’ HEAVENLY BODIES AND DAVID BOWIE’S UNTOUCHABLE BRILLIANCE

By Bomani Jones JANUARY 11, 2016

There is nothing more attractive about a musician than audacity. We give our stars the freedom to do pretty much whatever they want, so long as they please us. The irony of that trade is they often become musically safe in order to protect the spoils that come with stardom.

But then there are those who are stars. They exist among us, but they shine hot and bright enough to keep us all warm. And David Bowie, to paraphrase an amazingly self-indulgent KRS-ONE quote, was the sun.

He knew he was a star. He had to have the biggest balls in the world to do the 1971 album Hunky Dory, a glamorously folk — or was it folksy glam? — exploration of the thrills and terror of fatherhood, his physical and emotional vulnerability on full display, then follow it up a year later with the declaration that he was the alien messiah. Just three tracks into The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders of Mars, it became clear he could be that, too. He could be whatever he wanted: the struggling human we could all relate to or the Nietszchean evolution of humanity; the soul singer who didn’t actually have any soul or the hard rocker both in 1969 and 20 years later. He seemed to be influenced by all, grateful to many, the inspiration to more and tethered to none……

Continue Reading: ‘Heroes,’ Heavenly Bodies and David Bowie’s Untouchable Brilliance

3.

Where Does This Game Rank?

After a yawner of a bowl season, college football needed a little drama in the College Football Playoff National Championship Presented by AT&T.

We got more than a little drama, as Alabama had to fight back in the fourth quarter and then hold on to defeat Clemson 45-40 in a game that featured a little bit of everything — heroic performances by both quarterbacks, enormous plays on special teams and a breakout game for the ages by a player who hadn’t scored a touchdown all season.

The gold standard for national title games remains Texas’ 41-38 win over USC a decade ago in the 2006 BCS Championship Game at the Rose Bowl. Hard to believe it has been 10 years since that classic.

What we witnessed Monday night in Glendale, Arizona, was the perfect segue to take a little stroll down memory lane — and merited a re-ranking of any top-10 list. Which national championship games, or those bowl games that led to a national championship for a team, were most memorable?

We’ve taken the liberty of ranking the top 10, updating it with the Alabama-Clemson thriller, based on a number of factors, including entertainment value, dramatic finishes, great performances, memorable plays, surprising upsets and any other interesting and/or historic elements about the game itself. In other words, don’t look for any yawners or runaways in this list, regardless of how attractive the matchup might have looked coming into the game.

Here’s what we came up with:…..

Continue Reading: Instant classic: Alabama-Clemson crash-lands into top 10 title games ever

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