On the Hump…

idiot

A kid from Ohio won a championship in Cleveland, and it wasn’t LeBron.  Now we have articles like this – and to me, completely missing the point of what we witnessed.  LeBron became the first player ever to lead BOTH teams in points, rebounds and assists – and the guy who guarded him gets the MVP?!  Sure, it’s a nice story, Iguodola’s rise from bench role-player to Finals MVP, but what are we evaluating anymore?  The current league MVP got 0 votes and 7 out of 11 voters voted for a guy who could not stop LeBron.  I doubt LeBron would have wanted it anyway…

Maybe my point is, we should appreciate a bit more what we saw – because after the guy in this picture got his tattoo – Love went down, then Kyrie went down, and it is like we have said around here before – you do not tempt fate – ask Kentucky fan and the other dopes about #KarmicRespnsibility.  Now, at least, we know we will never see a Finals MVP from a losing team again; if not last night, then never.  Clearly the dogmatic-media chumps are too rancorous to separate performance from result.  The Warriors went wire-to-wire, and deserved this title – none of that will be as memorable as James toting this sack of rocks up the hill like Sisyphus. James showed he’s still the world’s best, one of the best ever, and in losing, somehow managed to play the doomed, tragic hero archetype.  Who’d-a-thunk that?

  • Iguodala, Warriors finish off Cavaliers for first title in 40 years

    The Warriors clinched their first NBA championship in 40 years, defeating the Cavaliers, 105-97, in Game 6. Andre Iguodala, who was named Finals MVP, scored 25 points in Game 6 (tying Stephen Curry for the team-lead), marking his only 25-point game since the start of the 2014-15 regular season. Iguodala is the first player in NBA history to score at least 25 points in a Finals-clinching victory without recording any 25-point games in the preceding regular season or earlier in that year’s playoffs.

    nullGreen records triple-double in Game 6 clincherDraymond Green was a huge contributor in the Warriors’ road to glory as well, recording 16 points in Game 6 along with a team-high 11 rebounds and 10 assists. The 25-year-old became the sixth player to record a triple-double for the victorious team in a Finals clincher, joining Magic Johnson (1982 and 1985), Larry Bird (1986), James Worthy (1988), Tim Duncan (2003), and LeBron James (2012). Magic had been the only player before Green to achieve that feat on his opponents’ home floor – Johnson recorded 14 points, 10 rebounds, and 14 assists at Boston Garden in Game 6 of the 1985 Finals.

    For the 2015 playoffs as a whole, Green averaged 13.7 points, 10.1 rebounds, and 5.2 assists per game. Tim Duncan is the only other player in the last 30 years who won a championship, having averaged double-figures in both points and rebounds along with at least five assists per game throughout the playoffs; Duncan averaged 24.7 points, 15.4 rebounds, and 5.3 assists in the 2003 playoffs. Other players to reach those heights reads like a list of the all-time greats: Bill Russell (six times in the 1960’s), Larry Bird (1981 and 1984), Magic Johnson (1980 and 1982),Bill Walton (1977), Wilt Chamberlain (1967), Tom Gola (1956), and Neil Johnston (1956)

    nullLeBron falls short despite superhuman effort

    LeBron James did all he could for the Cavaliers, leading the team with 32 points, 18 rebounds, and nine assists in Game 6. James, who also led the Cavs in those three categories in Game 2 and Game 5, is the second player in the shot-clock era to lead his team (or tie for the team-lead) in points, rebounds, and assists at least three times in a single NBA Finals. Tim Duncan had three such games leading the Spurs in the 2003 Finals against the Nets.

    James had also led the Heat in points, rebounds, and assists in six of Miami’s Finals games from 2012 to 2014 (two per year). No other player achieved that feat even once in a Finals game over the last five years.


 

St. Louis Cardinals Hackers Facing Serious Federal Jail Time

Someone is going to jail.  As for the the organization, you would think a minimum, 8 figure fine.  I would give them a post season ban for a few years as well.  The Corporate Espionage that the Cardinals, knowingly and willingly conspired to, did not just impact the Astros – it impacted lots of other teams that compromised relationships with players and damaged salary and trade negotiations.  For some involved, this has to equate to lifetime banishment – this goes beyond Pete Rose’s transgressions or Shoeless Joe’s.  We have witnessed other leagues’ commissioners deal with some sort of league-wide crisis recently, but nothing like this – I wonder what Roger Goodell would do???

  • Home run derby at Camden Yards

    The Orioles played longball and then some against the Phillies on Tuesday, cranking out a franchise-record eight home runs in their 19-3 victory. Manny Machado started the barrage with a leadoff homer in the first inning and then homered again to begin the second inning for the O’s. Machado is just the third player in the last 50 years to lead off both the first and second innings of a game with a home run. The other two to do so in the last half-century are Chad Curtis, who achieved that feat with the Tigers on May 28, 1995 against the White Sox, and Stan Javier, who hit two leadoff shots for the Giants on April 11, 1999 versus the Padres.

    nullLong(ball) night for Phillies bullpen

    Dustin McGowan had a rough night in relief for the Phillies, allowing five of the Orioles’ eight home runs in 3.1 innings pitched. McGowan is just the fifth pitcher in the modern era – and the first in Phillies history – to surrender at least five homers in a game while pitching in relief. The four others to do so since 1900 are George Caster (1940), Craig Skok (1978), Frank Pastore (1979), and Andrew Lorraine(2002) – Caster gave up six homers while the other three pitchers allowed five.

    Justin De Fratus also allowed a home run in relief for the Phillies, as did Jeff Francoeur, who took the mound for the first time in his 11-year major-league career to throw two mop-up innings. The seven home runs allowed by the Phillies bullpen matched the major-league record for most homers allowed by a team’s relievers in a single game. There had been two previous instances of a team’s relief pitchers allowing exactly seven long balls – the Reds’ relievers did so on June 6, 1939 at the Polo Grounds against the Giants, and the Orioles’ pen served up seven at Toronto on September 14, 1987.

    nullHolt hits for cycle

    Brock Holt doubled to lead off Tuesday’s game for the Red Sox against Julio Teheran and the Braves, then singled in the fifth inning, hit a solo homer in the seventh, and tripled in his final at-bat to complete the first cycle in the majors this season. Holt is the first player to hit for the cycle against the Braves since the Mets’ Keith Hernandez did so on July 4, 1985. Atlanta’s streak of 4776 games without allowing a player to hit for the cycle had been the longest active streak in the major leagues by a wide margin. That distinction now belongs to the Blue Jays – Toronto has not allowed a cycle in its last 3954 games. The last player to record a cycle against the Jays was Hall-of-Famer George Brett on July 25, 1990.

    More goose eggs for Pirates

    The Pirates continued their mastery on the mound, blanking the White Sox, 3-0, to win their sixth straight game. Pittsburgh has kept its opponent off the scoreboard in five of those six wins, marking the first time in almost 20 years that a team recorded five shutouts within a six-game span. The Orioles were the last team with such a span, having finished the 1995 regular season with five consecutive shutouts. The only other time that Pittsburgh posted at least five shutouts over a six-game span took place 112 years ago! The Pirates posted six consecutive shutouts from June 2 to June 8, 1903 – two over the Giants, three against the Boston Beaneaters, and one versus the Phillies.